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Basic Survival Skills for the Hunter and Outdoorsman

What Every Hunter and Outdoorsman Ought to Know

There’s a thin line between the hunter and the hunted. I’ll help you shoot for the former.

When I think of the best days of my life I think of my birthday, my wedding, my child’s birth, and… the time I came home safely from a huntaftertaking down an extremely elusive Whitetail Deer and seeing my family savor the venison steak. Yum!

And you might be thinking, “I would love that too!”

Well, I’m with you. I can help you.

Outdoors Is not for the careless and unprepared

You see, venturing outdoors whether as a hunter or bushcraft outdoorsman is as exciting as it is unpredictable. If you’re not careful and prepared, the odds are against you.

According to the International Hunter Education Association (IHEA), roughly 1,000 hunting accidents happen in the U.S. and Canada each year. 100 (10%) of which are fatal.

 


HUNTER INCIDENT & SAFETY Q&A

What are the 4 types of shooting related hunting accidents?

Hunter judgment mistakes: mistaking another person for game or not thoroughly the foreground or background before shooting.

Safety violations: including pointing the muzzle in an unsafe direction and ignoring proper procedures for crossing a fence, obstacle, or difficult terrain.

Lack of firearm training, control, and practice can lead to accidental firearm discharge, stray shots, etc.

Mechanical failure: obstructed barrel or improper ammunition.

 

What are common hunting accidents?

1. Tree stand accident

"Hunting-related accidents and injuries have been largely attributed to falls from tree stands. This is the most common way hunters are injured, debunking the popular misconception of intoxicated hunters sustaining self-inflected ballistic injuries. When hunters fall from tree stands, they can reach a velocity of up to 30 mph. Yet these common hunting-related accidents often go unreported as victims only present to hospitals with serious injuries." Source: NIH

2. Accidental shooting

3. ATV accident

4. Drowning

5. Animal attack

6. Shrapnel

What are 4 hunting safety rules?

Treat every firearm as if it were loaded.

Control the muzzle, keep it pointed in a safe direction.

Identify your target and what lies beyond.

Keep your finger off the trigger until ready to fire.

Do hunters ever shoot each other?

One of the most common causes of hunting fatalities in this country, and others, are failures to identify the target—mistaking people for game. So, to answer the question; Yes hunters do sometimes accidently shoot another hunter.

The golden rule in firearm safety is to identify your target beyond any doubt. Hunter education and awareness about high visibility clothing have helped over time to reduce accident rates, but unfortunatly many incidents go unreported to state hunting incident databases and it's almost impossible to find accurate national statistics.

What are the 4 C of hunting?

Always make sure your actions are courteous, considerate, capable, and careful.

Now, imagine your worst-case scenario outdoors.

Would you know what to do when (not if) that happens to you? Would you survive and get back home alive?

To help you answer with a big “Yes”, we’ll go over the things every hunter and outdoorsman (both beginner and master) ought to know preparation prior, gear handling, and skills to survive the outdoors.

So, stay with me and get the best out of your outdoor expedition.

Before going outdoors and hunting

1. Know your local laws

What good is having the best hunting gears if you’re not even allowed to use them? Thus,know the rules and hunt by the rules!

Familiarize yourself with the state’s hunting regulations⸺ games allowed, hunting methods (rifle or bow?), hunting season, restricted zones, etc.

2. Know how to properly transport your hunting weapons

If you choose to hunt in another state or country (African hunting safari sounds like fun), know the legal way to transport your gear, guns and ammo particularly.

Traveling airline?Check out our comprehensive guide on how to legally fly with your guns and ammo like a boss.

Note that laws vary by state and place. Hence, do your research or consult a legal advisor beforehand.

3. Get your hunting safety card and correct license

Most states require a safety card by completing a certified hunting course. Get one for your own good.

Hunting rules are not universal. Same goes with a hunting license and permit. It depends on the hunting territory, species you fancy, and mood of sheriff Bobby.

4. Keep someone you trust informed

As much as you’d like to keep that hunting Shangri-la to yourself, telling someone your itinerary could be the difference between being rescued with your beef in the bag and you in the bag.

Moreover, tell them when you should be back.

5. Practice and protect your hunting gears

Don’t wait until you’re out there before you unbox newly bought items. Way before your outdoor trip, know every nut and bolt of your gears. Break in new boots. Calibrate your hunting rifle using reliable steel shooting targets.

Once you’re out there, second-guessing your gear could be fatal.

Wanna keep your gears in tip-top shape and increase longevity? Use lockable bags and cases to protect them from the elements and accidental rifle discharge.

 


Sold out

Features

  •  
  • Material: Reinforced polypropylene
  • Gray exterior, black handle
  • Customizable foam interior
  • Dark gray
  • Two exterior handles
  • Four easy open & close camlock latches
  • Pressure release valve
  • Rubber seal
  • Waterproof
  • Dustproof
  • Shockproof
  • Lockable (padlocks sold separately)
  • Guaranteed for a lifetime
  • TSA Travel Compliant
  •  

Specifications:

  • Outside Dimensions: 6.00" H x 44.00" W x 16.00" D
  • Weight: 24.00 Pounds

Sold out

Features

 

Material: Reinforced polypropylene
Wheels
Gray exterior, black handle
Customizable foam interior
Dark gray
Two exterior handles, black
Four easy open & close camlock latches
Pressure release valve
Rubber seal
Waterproof
Dustproof
Shockproof
Lockable (padlocks sold separately)
Guaranteed for a lifetime
TSA Travel Compliant


Specifications:

Outside Dimensions: 6.00" H x 53.00" W x 16.00" D
Weight: 27.00 Pounds

Sold out

Features

 

Material: Reinforced polypropylene

  • Gray exterior, black handle
  • Customizable foam interior
    • Dark gray
  • Two exterior handles
  • Four easy open & close camlock latches
  • Pressure release valve
  • Rubber seal
  • Waterproof
  • Dustproof
  • Shockproof
  • Lockable (padlocks sold separately)
  • Guaranteed for a lifetime
  • TSA Travel Compliant
  •  

Specifications:

  • Outside Dimensions: 6.00" H x 53.00" W x 14.00" D
  • Weight: 23.00 Pounds

“Be the hunter, not the hunted: Never allow your unit to be caught with its guard down.”

—James Mattis

Survival skills true hunters and outdoorsmen
don’t go out without

1. Creating a makeshift shelter

Believe it or not, you can only last 3 hours without shelter in a harsh environment. And when your tent fails, would you know how to not become a sitting duck?

The foundation of shelter:

  1. Something to sleep on (foliage or moss as a mattress)
  2. Something to sleep in (pile of big leaves and debris as a blanket)
  3. Something to sleep under (branches and long grasses as roof)

2. Procuring drinkable water

After shelter, water is your next priorityyou can only last 3 days without it.

Don’t know where the water is? Out in the wild, animals navigate best and their tracks can lead you to the nearest water source.

Be careful though.“Clear” doesn’t always mean “clean”. Always filter out sediments and boil to kill pathogens before drinking.

3. Making fire

Since the dawn of humanity, fire is man’s best friend (given you don’t mess with it).

It provides warmth and illumination, cooks your food, wards off bugs and predators, and boosts your morale (the movie “Cast Away”, anyone?).

For this, learn how to make fire the primitive way hand drill, bow drill, rocks sparks because your lighter and matches are not failsafe.

4. Tying knots

You’re nuts knowing knotting knots not. (I can wait)

Seriously though, knowing the basic knots like bowline and prussic is critical for building strong shelter, trapping, and general tying purposes. The best way to learn knots is thru a visual demo (in other words…YouTube) and doing it yourself.

5. Signaling for help

Never discount the possibility of you getting stuck deep in the mountains perhaps due to injury or weather. In which case, knowing how to signal for help is your lifeline.

Here are the most effective ways:

Fire and smoke

The trick is to create a big black smokerubber and green foliage work best (flare aside). The smoke can be seen from miles away. And with you waving both hands near it, rescuers will have an easy day.

Light reflection

This works well in an open area where sunlight is unobstructed. Use a mirror, polished blade, aluminum foil, or anything shiny. Place two fingers in between the mirror and rescuer to ensure the reflection is aligned. Then, all the rescuer has to do is to look in your direction.

Loud noise

By far the easiest method is by blowing a whistle or banging two metal objects against each other (or shout if you’ve got a deafening soprano).

Pro tip:SOS is the universal Morse Code signal for distress. That’s a sequence of 3 dots, 3 dashes, then 3 dots. I.e.: 3 short sounds (or flashes), 3 long sounds, then 3 short sounds.

Hunt and bushcraft with care, life has no spare

Whatever hunting season you’re in and whatever terrain you do bushcraft, you can never be too careful. With the right preparation, survival skills, and high-quality (not expensive) travel gears, the outdoors is for you, not against you.

Time to go out there, bring home the bacon, and have the best days of your life!

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How to Prepare for a Long-term Power Outage

It’s nothing short of a miracle that we’ve progressed as far as we have since the industrial era. We’ve built machines. We’ve conquered space. We’ve made life easier (so it seems). But the fact remains⸺ nothing lasts forever, even good times.

The Safe by Mykel Hawke (Survival Expert)

Valuables can be something as simple as old family photos or important administrative documents. No matter what they are, or how they’re defined, we all have something we care for and want to protect.


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